Produce multiple pdfs in LaTeX with automated cross-references

For some time I looked for a way to simplify the process of linking LaTeX files of my manuscripts with the replies to editors and referees. In particular, I was looking for a way to automatically update cross-references (i.e. to put a \ref in the replies and link it to a \label in the mansuctipt – for example for a table), and also to put direct quotes of the from the main text into a report (e.g. if you want to tell the editor/referee if you have a specific sentence, paragraph or even table added to the revised manuscript).

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Line spacing in footnotes

When submitting papers, journals often require double-spaced footnotes. While there seem to be different approaches to it, this one worked quite well. It requires the footnotemisc package. You simply need to enter the following code in the preamble of your LaTeX file:

\usepackage{footmisc}
\renewcommand{\footnotelayout}{\setstretch{2}}

Avoiding widows and orphans in LaTeX documents

To avoid paragraphs ending with a single line on the following page often looks a bit ugly. Especially when they are then followed by figures or tables. Single lines of a page-overlapping paragraph are called “widows” and “orphans”. How can we tell TeX to avoid those? With the following code, you tell TeX that it should put a penalty on these types of layouts. Setting this penalty very high (typically 10.000) avoids widows and orphans almost entirely. Just add the following code in the preamble of your document.

\clubpenalty = 10000
\widowpenalty = 10000 \displaywidowpenalty = 10000

Track Changes in LaTeX and compare documents

One big disadvantage of writing in LaTeX compared to writing in other software, such as Word, is that its absence of track changes. Although there are ways to do track changes, such as the online tex-editor Sharelatex or the trackchanges package, I have sticked to commenting out deleted parts of the text, or by highlighting new passages in red. Continue reading

Use images from pdf documents in Latex

While you can simply drag & drop images in MS Word or Powerpoint, doing this in Latex requires a few more steps. An important difference is that in Latex, you first need to save the copied file as a separate image file which can then be included in the Latex code. For this purpose, we need a decent image editor. I recommend using Continue reading

Formatting Tables in Latex

There are a lot of sources giving advice on how to format your Latex tables. Adrian P. Robson (adrian.robson@nepsweb.co.uk) wrote a very good and comprehensive guide on formatting tables in Latex. Just follow the following link to download the PDF file:

LATEX Table Hints and Tips (by Adrian P. Robson, adrian.robson@nepsweb.co.uk)